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Project Record

International Congress of Entomology 2000

PROJECT
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 01-08-2000
 30-09-2000
 Rural Livelihoods Advisory and Support Services Commission (ASSC)
 Central Research Department (now Research and Evidence Division)


  Global


To submit three papers to the Congress, two of which will be of direct relevance to development issues.
To act as convener of the Symposium 'Technologies for Movement and Migration Research' and to edit the Proceedings which will be published.
To act as guest editor for a special issue of 'Computers in Agriculture', publishing the papers presented in this Symposium.
Presentation of paper "Seasonal monitoring of the insect fauna flying at altitude over southern England: results from a vertical-looking radar".
Presentation of a paper "Studies of foraging flight with a harmonic radar".
Presentation of a paper "Compensation for wind drift by bumble bees."

The Congress is the major international entomological meeting, and it is held every four years. It attracts the leading agricultural and veterinary entomologists from both the developing and developed countries, and so is an ideal forum at which to disseminate the results of our DFID-funded work in radar entomology.

Back to Office Report 12 Sept 00

Publication in Proceedings, to be submitted by May 2001

A special issue of COMPAG (Computers in Agriculture) will publish manuscripts from the contributors to the Symposium ,Technologies for movement and migration research,, with one or two additional relevant papers from invited contributors who were not able to attend the Congress.

Publications

Back to office report

Riley, J.R., Reynolds D.R. & Smith, A.D. (2000) Seasonal monitoring of the insect fauna flying at altitude over southern England: results from a vertical-looking radar. Abstract Book I - XXI International Congress of Entomology, Brazil, August 20-26 2000, No. 0138.

Riley, J.R., Smith, A.D. & Reynolds D.R. (2001) The use of harmonic radar to investigate the flight of insects at low altitude. Computers in Agriculture special issue (submitted)

Chapman, J.W., Smith, A.D., Woiwod, I.P., Reynolds, D.R. & Riley, J.R. (2001) Development of vertical-looking radar technology for monitoring insect migration. Computers in Agriculture special issue (submitted).

Riley, J.R., Smith, A.D. & Reynolds D.R. (2000) Studies of foraging flights with harmonic radar. Abstract Book I - XXI International Congress of Entomology, Brazil, August 20-26 2000, No. 0743.

Progress against Milestones 2000/01:

In addition to my scheduled paper, 'Studies of foraging flights with harmonic radar', an additional presentation was made, 'How bees cope with different wind conditions', in order to fill a gap due to a late cancellation. Harmonic Radar, developed principally with DFID support, remained unique in its ability to provide geometrically accurate and dynamic records of insect flight over distances of hundreds of meters. Its potential to contribute to research on the host-finding flight of biting flies, especially tsetse, was unchallenged, but seems unlikely to be realised in the immediate future because of lack of funding.

A paper entitled 'Seasonal monitoring of insect fauna flying at altitude over southern England' was presented to the Symposium Forecasting and Managing Agricultural Insect Pests and Natural Enemies (No 9 of Session 2: Agricultural Entomology). This and others by A Drake (University of New South Wales), I Woiwod (IACR-Rothamsted) and D Reynolds (NRI) were about vertical looking radar (VLR). This technique, pioneered by NRI with DFID funding, is now established as the only practical means of conducting long-term surveys of insect aerial activity at altitude for both pest management and environmental monitoring tasks. Although there has been no take-up so far in the developing countries, China is funding an evaluation of the technique for pest management purposes, and two VLRs are currently being deployed in support of the Australian plague locust control effort.

The Symposium, (Technologies for Movement and Migration Research, No 1 of Session 5 Computer Science Applied to Entomology) was well attended and presentations were of a good standard, covering the range of techniques used to study insect movement on all scales.


£0
  882636002


R0289